3 years ago#1
arly2380
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Hello All,

I resumed running a couple of months ago after a year's lay-off due to various pressures - mainly to do with excessive business travelling which unfortunately I cannot avoid.

Anyway, i am enjoying it and it's great to regain fitness. However i am significatly heavier than i was a year ago and I need and want to get off the excess baggage in order to make the running easier.

I am 45 years old and I am currently running for about an hour five mornings a week. i am thinking of doing a light run of about thirty minutes five evenings as well .

Would that be manageable and advisable at my age ? I'd be grateful if any experts out there can advise me.

The last thing i want or need is an injury that would set me back again. My fitness level is only average though I'm keen to improve. I did do a marathon ten years ago but I don't think I am in the kind of shape to try anything like that at the moment. I can run non-stop for an hour quite comfortably.

It is just that those extra kilos I am carrying mat the moment are holding me back and I need to get rid of them.

Any advice will be appreciated

Thanks and regards,

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3 years ago#2
johnb123
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I don't know that your will find any 'experts' in this group, but there are some very knowledgeable people and many 'experiments of one!' In my opinion doing two a days as an over 40 runner is risking injury. That said, you may be one of the rare ones that can get away with it! My recommendation, however, would be to increase the intensity of your one run per day. If, as you say, you can do a one hour run pretty easily then you are definitely ready for greater intensity; that may lead to the weight loss that you are seeking. Chuck

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3 years ago#3
TrAI
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Welcome back, John. It sounds as though you can certainly handle running more than five times per week, but I jumping from 5 to 10 times per week and increasing mileage by 50% seems too drastic.

I would start by adding a run or two per week. Also, since you seem to be comfortable with your daily 60 minutes, I'd consider designating one run per week as your 'long run' and gradually increase that run up to 90 minutes.

Good luck!

- Chris

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3 years ago#4
cipriano
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If I were you, I wouldn't consider two-a-days...

Just be patient... The pounds will come off. You are better off lengthening your runs than adding two-fers. Two-fers can greatly increase your risk of injury, even for the most fit and experienced runners.

-Chazzer

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3 years ago#5
brian.c
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beyond that of mere mortals, wrote:

I am not an expert, but around fifteen years ago when I was a young 45 year old snot-nose, my chiropractor advised me not to run too often. In fact, he advised me not to run two days in a row. He said that the miniscus in the knees gets thinner with age and also it takes 48 hours for the body to repair any damage caused by running. This has worked for me but maybe you should see a chiropractor or medical doctor of your own first. Some advice: when looking for a doctor regarding exercise, don't pick one who is overweight with a big stogie in his mouth - his advice would probably be that running is dangerous. LOL. Ken (NY)

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3 years ago#6
SteveTheEgg
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Why do you do the same thing 5 days a week? Vary it a little. Do a long run. Work in some doubles (I wouldn't double everyday). If you just start running twice everyday you'll be risking overtraining and it's almost impossible to lose weight when you're overtraining - well, without seriously restricting your diet.

Your age doesn't really factor into it. It might take you a while longer to build up safely to this point, but otherwise I don't think it matters.

Personally, I'd recommend trying to go faster on these runs. The more distance you cover, the more you burn. I know unless I force myself (which I'm getting better at) I can't go for an hour run comfortably.

You're already running a lot. I think you should be focusing more attention on your diet.

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3 years ago#7
RayRC
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All of Jeff's comments are right on. I've found that doing some faster runs helps a lot to lose weight because it seems to increase your metabolism even after you've completed the run and for quite a while afterwards. Don't try to do all the runs fast, but vary hard days with easy days and get a lot of variety.

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3 years ago#8
JohnBStone
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Frankly, I think adding the extra half hour to your current runs (or varying your pace as suggested by others) would be more beneficial than pegging on a short run in the evening.

But if you can't do that, then be very careful about increasing the amount of running. Don't just start running those extra 30 minutes every day. Add one on, say, Monday and Friday and see how it feels. Keep that for two weeks and add another day.

Monitor your body signs for overtraining and be willing to back off if need be.

I don't think age has all that much to do with it. I'm 52 and have a pretty significant regimen, as do other codgers here.

Mike Tennent 'IronPenguin' Ironman Canada '98 Great Floridian '99, '00

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3 years ago#9
arly2380
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I qualify on the latte count, so...

In my experience twice a day was a road straight into ITB hell - I didn´t even increase my amount of hours-on-feet and the mileage increased less than 10% due to the increased percentage of time I ran at a faster pace!

A month of this - and I didn´t run for three months (and more than a year until I felt I was back where I started)...

The shortened recovery period between runs was the culprit, according to every informed opinion. There is a _tremendous_ difference, at 30 as well as at 40 or 45.

That _or_ make the one run longer if schedule allows.

If not, do something different: swim, row, cycle.

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3 years ago#10
duck168
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I'd only run twice daily if I felt unsatisfied. The risk of injury is too great. I did it for three years, dropping one run every two weeks for a 'rest'. But I was in my twenties, normal weight, and ran because I felt the urge.

Twice as old I now run only 25 times a month. I only feel the urge once a day.

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3 years ago#11
jillsandr
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I am 49 and have been losing quite a few pounds lately by running about 45mins. to an hour most mornings, longer on the weekends, with at least one rest day, usually two, per week. I mix in - as a second activity about three times per week - some rope-jumping, circuit training & light weights. I have tried running twice a day intermittently over the years (a runner since 1970) but I have found that my legs become too fatigued.

For sustained weight loss it is just as important (as physical activity) to take a good look at your diet: what has really worked for me is to reduce portion size, eat much more fresh fruit and healthy snacks, much less candy, cookies, chips, cheeseburgers and other junk...

And remember to stay hydrated at all times.

Bert

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